My A/V Media Diet

What do you watch and listen to on a regular basis?  We are what we eat, and that goes for the information we consume.  Today’s post (part 2 of a 3 part series) is about the sources that make up my Audio/Visual  media diet.

Audio Subscriptions

I have been a devoted listener and subscriber to The Mars Hill Audio Journal since 2003.  Ken Myers, from Charlottesville, VA, has created an audio journal that is exactly opposite everything our popular culture embraces: his interviews are long, unconcerned with the latest and loudest, and deeply concerned with the deep questions that humans have been asking for millennia.

The name of the Journal comes from Acts 17, where the Apostle Paul goes to Mars Hill in Athens and interacts with the pagan philosophers on their own terms.

Podcasts

  • The Eric Metaxas Showwhich features Eric Metaxas and his wide variety of guests;
  • Andy Stanley Leadership Podcast;
  • Munger Place Audio Podcast: though it’s painful for me to listen to my own sermons, I still do so from time to time because I know that hearing myself helps me become a better preacher;
  • Fresh Air: Half the time I’m either completely uninterested in Terry Gross’s interviews or else in complete disagreement with her perspective, and the other half of the time I’m captivated by the long-form interviews featured on Fresh Air;
  • In Our Time, a long-running radio show on the BBC hosted by Melvyn Bragg, who interviews British academics to talk in detail about history, science, etc.
  • This Is Your Life with Michael Hyatt.  I liked the earlier version of this podcast better than the current episodes, but from time to time I still benefit from Michael Hyatt’s insights on productivity and leadership.

Television

I don’t watch much television these days and we don’t have cable.  When I do watch TV, it’s mainly with my family and mainly on Sundays: NFL football, 60 Minutes, and America’s Funniest Videos.  As a family, we also watched American Ninja Warrior on Mondays this summer.

I’ve watched every episode of Arrested Development multiple times (via Netflix and Hulu), and, until Netflix took it off the air, would also rewatch Fawlty Towers.  (This watching of the same shows over and over again drives my wife crazy.)

Social Media

I reluctantly use Facebook for my job because it helps me stay connected with people in my congregation, and it helps me remember names.  On the other hand, I’ve been an enthusiastic user of Twitter: I like the ways it allows me to follow lots of really interesting people.

However, as I wrote about a few weeks ago, in early summer 2015 I deleted both the Facebook and Twitter apps from my iPhone and I haven’t looked back.  I still use Facebook from time to time, but I’ve essentially not read anything on Twitter for over 3 months.

Audiobooks

I love audiobooks, and in the last year have been using the Overdrive app from the Dallas Public Library, which allows you to check out audiobooks from your local public library.  (I have to be honest, though, and tell you that I miss books on tape.  Those were the days.)

Coming in Part 3

The final installment in this series will run next Monday and will be about I subscribe to and read in print: books, magazines, journals, etc.  (Click here to read part 1, about my online media diet.)  The above was what I listen to and watch on a regular basis.

What about you?  What sources make up your A/V media diet?

 

 

P.S.  Subscribe!

If you’ve read this far, why not subscribe for updates from my blog?  I supposedly post 3 times a week on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays (I say supposedly because it’s been much less frequently recently).  Click here to subscribe.

 

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “My A/V Media Diet

  1. Wow, my initial reaction to the first two weeks of this topic is, how do you have time to follow/read all this? I could not even do a fraction of this. Maybe that is part of my problem??

    The main thing I read is scripture. I also listen to is sermons from church. I get the cd every week that has 3 of our sermons on it and I listen to them 3 or 4 times each. It takes that long for it to soak into my thick skull. I love our church and I aligned with the sermons from our church on about a 90-95% basis. But I know I am getting a little more moderate view from our church pastors, so I like to hear the more conservative perspective as well. So, I usually supplement that with cd series from more conservative points of view, like Jack Graham, Charles Stanley, and occasionally Dr Jeffers, etc.). I agree with their perspective at a much lower percentage, but I still get a lot out of it. Then to balance it off more to the left, I read or listen to sermons, books, etc. from more liberal viewpoints (Rod Bell would be a good example). Interesting, I like them all, even though Dr Jeffers and Jack Graham both describe Rod Bell as a sign of the end times. They did not actually call him the anti-Christ, but they both have come close to describing him that way.

    • Paul,

      I don’t want to imply that I read all of that stuff every day, but that those are places to which I regularly go.

      I’ve never heard Jack Graham preach, though I’ve heard all the other guys.

      Andrew

    • I like to listen to books on disc when I go on a road trip. They really occupy my mind and makes the time go so much faster. But I bet my books aren’t nearly as intellectual as yours…..in fact, I can guarantee it. 😃 I’m heading to Colorado next month and would welcome any suggestions. It is a 12 hour drive each way. My dogs are great company, but they are pretty quiet for most of the drive.

      • I made a small contribution ($25) to Rev Jack Graham’s ministry (I think it is called Power Point Ministries) and in return they sent me his sermon series on CDs on the book of Revelation. I am about halfway through it and I really like it. There are two main schools of thought on Revelation (and probably a lot in between). One takes the view that Revelation is all about what was happening back then in Rome, etc. and the other is that it is a book of prophesy of things to come. I like both views, but a lean towards the prophesy take. Walt Marcum is great source for the historical perspective and he has done series on in it Kyrigma (sp?) which you could download podcast from the church website (I think). I am finding Jack Graham’s series to be a good source for the more conservative perspective.

  2. I recently stumbled upon the Faith and Life Lecture Series podcasts. From their website: “The Faith & Life Lecture Series is a community service of both St. Philip the Deacon Lutheran Church and Mount Olivet Lutheran Church of Plymouth, both located in Plymouth, Minnesota”

    Here are the first few I listened to – they hooked me hard.

    1. Faith and Heroism – Eric Metaxas speaking about the life of Deitrich Bonhoeffer, a German pastor who was executed for plotting to assassinate Hitler.
    2. Faith and Conversion – Joseph Pearce speaking about his life as an infamous racist (leader of the National Front) and participant in “The Troubles” of Northern Ireland. Converted to Christ in prison after years of violence and hatred.
    3. Faith and Evidence – J. Warner Wallace, a cold-case detective speaks about how he uses years of forensics experience to scrutinize the claims of the gospels and ultimately declare that they are true.